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Periodic Table`s Four New Elements Help Complete the Seventh Row

January 6,2016 at 04:04 am

 

For the first time since 2011, the periodic table will once again have to be changed in textbooks and classrooms alike.   

 Four new elements, discovered by scientists in Japan, Russia and America, will fill out the seventh, and currently final row, and take the atomic numbers 113, 115, 117 and 118.

 The set of elements was confirmed on Dec. 30 by the U.S.-based International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

The IUPAC is the worldwide organization that overlooks chemical nomenclature, terminology and measurement.   

The organization announced that the Russian-American team of scientists at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California had supplied enough supporting evidence to receive credit for the discovery of elements 115, 117 and 118.   A team of Japanese scientists met the criteria for naming the new synthetic highly radioactive element 113, after working to create it over 12 years ago, according to the Associated Press. 

  “The chemistry community is eager to see its most cherished table finally being completed down to the seventh row,” Professor Jan Reedijk, president of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of IUPAC, said in recent press release.   “IUPAC has now initiated the process of formalising names and symbols for these elements temporarily named as ununtrium, (Uut or element 113), ununpentium (Uup, element 115), ununseptium (Uus, element 117), and ununoctium (Uuo, element 118).”  

 The current names given to the freshly discovered elements are only temporary, however, and will officially be given their permanent names by their respective discovering teams in the next coming months, according to the Guardian.    New elements can bear the name of a mythological concept, a mineral, a place or country, a property or even a scientist, the IUPAC says.   Riken Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, the organization whose team is credited with the research and existence of element 113, earlier stated that japonium could be a proposed name for the new element currently being referred to as ununtrium. It will be the first element to be named in Asia.